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What is hacker?

Hacker is a term used by some to mean "a clever programmer", especially "someone who tries to break into computer systems".


There is a community and shared culture of expert programmers and networking wizards that traces its history back through decades to the first time-sharing minicomputers and the earliest ARPAnet experiments. The members of this culture were the first "hackers". Breaking into computers and breaking phone systems have come to symbolize hacking in popular culture, but hacking culture is much more complex and moralistic than most people know.



So, here is the few tips that help you to become a hacker -


1. Problem solver - Creative brains are a valuable, limited resource.They shouldn't be wasted on re-inventing the wheel when there are so many fascinating new problems waiting out there.


To behave like a hacker, you have to believe that the thinking time of other hackers is precious, so much so that it's almost a moral duty for you to share information, solve problems and then give the solutions away just so other hackers can solve new problems instead of having to perpetually re-address old ones.


2. Think creatively - You can start thinking artistically. Hackers are like artists, philosophers, and engineers all rolled up into one. They believe in freedom and mutual responsibility.


3. Recognize and fight authority - The enemy of the hacker is boredom, drudgery, and authoritarian figures who use censorship and secrecy to strangle the freedom of information. Monotonous work keeps the hacker from hacking.


4. Make decision quickly - Quick decision maker can save lot of time. Hacker need to fast while making decision.


5. Learn more programming language - Learning how software works bystudying a programming language is an invaluable tool. It teaches you how to create your own programs, and how to debug them. It also gives you a better understanding of how programs work. Also, learning scripting languages such as Perl and PHP and even the basics of HTML web design, are advantageous for anyone interested in setting up and tweaking websites.


6. Write open-source software - Write programs that other hackers think are fun or useful, and give the program sources away to the whole hacker culture to use.


7. Help test and debug open-source software - Any open-source author who's thinking will tell you that good beta-testers (who know how to describe symptoms clearly, localize problems well, can tolerate bugs in a quickie release, and are willing to apply a few simple diagnostic routines) are worth their weight in rubies.


8. Learn alternative operating system - Many people today run some version of Microsoft Windows, which is fine for home and office use, but it is also a good idea to learn alternative operating systems such as Linux. Learning a Linux distro not only helps broaden your experience, but is a necessity when wanting to navigate Linux based servers runningwebsites and other web services.


9. Learn more on networking - Networks run the Internet and connect home or office computers together. It is important to know as much as you can on how networks operate, including basics like an IP address, OSI, port, protocol, router, and subnet mask.


10. Help test and debug open-source software - Any open-source author who's thinking will tell you that good beta-testers (who know how to describe symptoms clearly, localize problems well, can tolerate bugs in a quickie release, and are willing to apply a few simple diagnostic routines) are worth their weight in rubies.


10. Publish useful information - Another good thing is to collect and filter useful and interesting information into web pages or documents like Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) lists, and make those generally available. Maintainers of major technical FAQs get almost as much respect as open-source authors.